Universality of Divine Humanity

Universality of Divine Humanity

Throughout the past centuries, there have been few Western alternatives to the institutionalized religions of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. At various times there have been revivals of past religious traditions, such as Druidism during the Celtic Revival of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Over the past forty or so years, we have witnessed the establishment of neo-shamanism, neo-Druidism, modern heathenry, and modern paganism. These were birthed as alternatives to the three major Western religions as well as from people’s opposition to the destruction of nature and the biosystem.

What is lacking in these alternatives is a universal, foundational spiritual or religious philosophy that would underlie practices such as modern heathenry and modern paganism. Divine Humanity provides this philosophy. There is no dogma, doctrine, or rules of practice connected with Divine Humanity. In other words, individuals and groups may conduct rituals and ceremonies in a manner they see and feel is effective and matches their own belief systems. This includes the honoring of one’s chosen gods, goddesses, nature spirits, and so forth.

Divine Humanity is not institutionalized or hierarchal. It believes in original divinity, not original sin. It is a green, ecological, and egalitarian philosophy and religion and is all-inclusive. You do not have to pass a hierarchal “gatekeeper” to join, such as in the Christian church through baptism. There are no fees or donations required. All that is needed is the acceptance of Divine Humanity as your religion or philosophy and the willingness to awaken your spark or starlight within—with the additional acceptance of being in partnership with nature and walking gently on the earth with an open, loving, compassionate, and forgiving heart. These are asked of you with the realization that we are human as well as divine. We will make mistakes, get angry, and carry fear. Many times forgiveness of ourselves and others is needed. But life is a journey of becoming, not a destination of finality.